Team

 Projects I’m proud of

Any project where the clients can live comfortably without altering their lives.

Materials that excite me

I am drawn to materials that are allowed to endure and have inherent ornamentation — like concrete, steel and wood that oxidizes.

I wish I’d designed

A buttonhole. It is the most honest design on the planet.

I’m inspired by

People who have been through it and have responded up and out of the tradition. I like when someone leaps from a tradition as opposed to forcing a paradigm shift.

Ball point or felt tip?

Definitely felt tip. They move fast and flow, so are the fastest way to get something out of your brain.

Clinton Cuddington

Architect AIBC MRAIC /

Prior to forming Measured in 2007 Clinton had amassed an impressive public architecture pedigree, including nine years as an architect for Bing Thom Architects in Vancouver working on commissions that included the redevelopment and expansion of the Arena Stage Theatre in Washington, DC, and the Surrey Campus of Simon Fraser University. Working alongside Bing Thom, Clinton played a pivotal role as project architect on both commissions, which garnered international attention and won the firm numerous prestigious awards. In particular, the SFU building was recognized for a Special Jury Prize in France’s Marche International des Professionels de l’Immobilier.

In Measured, Clinton has actualized his vision to create a firm where architects can fully engage and collaborate with clients, builders and other artisans to create outcomes that far surpass the sum of the individuals involved.

It’s here Clinton is able to combine his hard-earned, traditional architectural roots and technical skill with the learned core values from his past that he holds dear. Among those values are a duty of care to the environment — which Measured exercises through its continuous pursuit of local, sustainable materials and partnerships with local craftspeople — and a sense of responsibility to clients that manifests in trust relationships and, ultimately, the delivery of authentically functional, enduring and beautiful spaces.

I grew up

As a free-spirited kid in a family of larger-than-life characters in Regina, Saskatchewan — which was a hotbed of abstract, expressionist art in Canada at the time. My mother was the daughter of an adventurous Texas rancher and an all-American cowgirl. My father learned his activist politics at the knee of his Canadian rum-runner-harbouring grandfather. Crafts, design and politics were always front and centre in our house.

Education

Master of Architecture, 1997 / The University of British Columbia

Bachelor of Environmental Studies, 1992 / University of Manitoba

Notable accomplishments/awards

For all Measured Architecture awards go to our About page.

Why Measured?

We wanted to create a firm where we could pursue the traditional approach to architecture while simultaneously engaging in two-way conversations and relationships with the builders, designers and other collaborators who bring our projects to fruition.

Path to architecture

While I took conscious steps to gather the right kinds of practical experience, I also worked hard to nourish and safeguard the core values I learned as a child — like the duty of care my grandfather took while building fences on his farm, the rules of composition my mother taught in her crafting courses, and the importance of long-term friendships. This combination enables me to design spaces where people can live authentically for the long haul.

 Projects I’m proud of

Any project where the clients can live comfortably without altering their lives.

Materials that excite me

I am drawn to materials that are allowed to endure and have inherent ornamentation — like concrete, steel and wood that oxidizes.

I wish I’d designed

A buttonhole. It is the most honest design on the planet.

I’m inspired by

People who have been through it and have responded up and out of the tradition. I like when someone leaps from a tradition as opposed to forcing a paradigm shift.

Ball point or felt tip?

Definitely felt tip. They move fast and flow, so are the fastest way to get something out of your brain.